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Budget news & information

2014-15 Budget Information

 

Exit poll report now available

The Guilderland Central School District conducted an exit survey during its Annual School Budget Vote on May 20, 2014. The purpose was to collect demographic data about who voted on the budget and information about why voters voted the way they did. The survey was voluntary and anonymous. Surveys were made available to voters at the polling sites for anyone who chose to fill one out after voting, both electronically and in paper form. While these results do not represent the opinions of all voters, they do provide many residents’ perceptions about the district and its proposed budget.
Read the complete exit survey report (PDF)

Thank you for your support!
2014-15 budget approved by voters

On Tuesday, May 20, Guilderland Central School District residents approved a $92,132,900 budget for the 2014-15 school year by a vote of 1736 (yes) to 901 (no). This budget represents a 1.22 percent increase in spending over the current year’s budget and will result in a 1.94 percent tax levy increase for district residents. Tax rates are estimated to increase by the same amount for residents of the Town of Guilderland.

Voters also approved a $995,000 bus and equipment proposition to purchase seven new buses and one maintenance plow truck by a vote of 1642 (yes) to 960 (no) and elected three members to the Board of Education. Election results are as follows:
• Judy Slack (1856 votes)
• Chris McManus (1840 votes)
• Allan Simpson (1804 votes)

 

Budget Hearing update

The annual GCSD Budget Hearing was held on Tuesday, May 13, in the Guilderland High School LGI. Unable to attend? View the presentation (PDF) or watch a replay of the event live on Channel 16 in the Town of Guilderland through budget vote day.

 

Board of Education adopts $92 million spending plan for 2014-15

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Changes ahead for schools,
GCSD receives additional aid in adopted state budget

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Interested in running for a seat on the GCSD Board of Education?

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Superintendent's 2014-15 budget proposal released on Feb. 27

Learn more

 

Please tell us what you think!

Since late October, Guilderland Central School District school and district leaders have been reviewing the current status of programs and staffing at all levels and developing budget recommendations for the upcoming school year based on enrollment projections, an analysis of student needs, and numerous additional external factors. However, with just over two months to go until the Board of Education is scheduled to adopt a budget for the upcoming school year, there is still much more work to be done to close Guilderland's projected $1.8 million budget gap heading into 2014-15. As the district struggles with the difficult and important choices ahead, we need to hear from you! Submit your budget feedback

Fact sheets on our toughest challenges (updated March 2014)

Want to learn more about some of the biggest challenges schools throughout New York State are facing? If so, please take a few moments to read through the fact sheets below: (click on the title of the fact sheet to open the PDF)

NYS Gap Elimination Adjustment (GEA): What is it? Why does it matter?

Mandates and mandate relief: Explains what mandates are and recaps the decades-old efforts to provide relief

Pensions: Explains public pensions, the latest pension "reform" changes and how the tax levy "cap" exclusion works

STAR: Explains New York's School TAx Relief (STAR) program

Today's Contingent Budgets: Raising the stakes for schools

The Three Tax Levy Limit Numbers: What are they and what do they mean?

New York's Tax Levy "Cap" Formula: Learn more about the eight-step calculation for schools

 

 

Aid Increases, GEA Remains in Governor’s Budget Proposal

On Tuesday, January 21, Governor Andrew Cuomo released his proposed budget for 2014-15. Learn more about what the Executive Budget Proposal means for public schools.

GEA infographic** New ** Learn more about what the GEA has meant for the Guilderland Central School District by clicking on the infographic at left. Since it was first enacted in 2010-11, GCSD has lost more than $16 million in promised state aid and has had to reduce more than 150 full-time equivalent positions. Under the governor's proposed budget, the district is slated to lose an additional $3.5 million in 2014-15.

 

 

 

 

Thank you to everyone who attended the event!
Community conversation reviews list of potential changes for 2014-15 school budget

On Wednesday, January 29, nearly 50 Guilderland Central School District parents, students, staff and community members attended a community conversation to take a closer look at the district’s budget development process and to review a list of all potential changes and reductions under consideration for 2014-2015. The event was the community’s first opportunity to provide input and comments on the recommendations and to ask direct questions of the building and district leaders who have proposed those changes. Learn more, view community conversation materials, and watch a recap of the event

** New ** A summary of all of the Community Conversation small group work, including participant comments and FAQs, is now available. Click here to read the summaries

 

 

 
To learn how to get involved, Download an Advocacy Toolkit (PDF) 

More than 1,000 pack Colonie Central High School to fight for schools in crisis

On January 30, more than 1,000 packed into Colonie Central High School to hear students, teachers and school district leaders talk about how cuts to education funding are affecting their schools. Billed as "NY Schools STILL in Fiscal Peril: Our Kids Can't Wait Another Year," the roundtable discussion centered on Gap Elimination Adjustment cuts which this year total $387 million for area schools.

View a brief video recap of event
View the video shown at the event: Advocacy--Our kids can't wait another year
Times Union story
News Channel 6 story
News Channel 13 story
View original story about the event

 

Superintendent of Schools sends letter to Governor Cuomo calling for the end of the Gap Elimination Adjustment (GEA)

On Dec. 20, Guilderland Central School District Superintendent of Schools Dr. Marie Wiles sent a letter to New York Governor Andrew Cuomo requesting that he take immediate steps to end the state's devastating Gap Elimination Adjustment (GEA) and inviting him to visit the district to see quality schools in action. Read the letter (PDF) The letter comes on the heels of the Dec. 10 Guilderland Board of Education meeting, where board members discussed priorities for the 2014-15 school budget. Based on current figures, the district is looking at a $2.7 million budget gap heading into next school year. This figure includes an anticipated reduction in state aid of $4 million as a result of the continuation of the state's GEA.

What is the GEA?
The Gap Elimination Adjustment (GEA) law was first introduced for the
2010-11 fiscal year by then-Governor Paterson as a way to help close New York’s then $10 billion budget deficit. Under the legislation, a portion of the funding shortfall at the state level is divided among all school districts throughout the state and reflected as a reduction in school district state aid. The GEA is a negative number, money that is deducted from the aid originally due to the district. Since the program began four years ago, the total GEA reduction in school aid for GCSD amounts to about $16 million.

Regional GEA interactive map
Every school district in New York has lost valuable funding due to the GEA. Click on a district below to learn just how much money the state has withheld:

 

Do you want to make a difference and join Dr. Wiles in advocating for an immediate end to the GEA?
You can make a difference by contacting the Governor and other elected officials, as well! The voices of school leaders and advocates for state-level education organizations simply are not enough, as recent legislative sessions have shown. Elected officials need to hear from you, their constituents. They need to hear from the people that are most directly affected by their decisions (or indecisions) year after year—the students, parents, employees, residents, community groups and business owners of Guilderland. Contact your elected officials

 

Want to learn more about the Gap Elimination Adjustment (GEA)?

The Gap Elimination Adjustment (GEA) law was first introduced for the 2010-11 fiscal year by then-Governor Paterson as a way to help close New York’s then $10 billion budget deficit. Under the legislation, a portion of the funding shortfall at the state level is divided among all school districts throughout the state and reflected as a reduction in school district state aid. The GEA is a negative number, money that is deducted from the aid originally due to the district. In 2013-14, Guilderland Central School District saw an overall loss in funds of $3.7 million as a result of the GEA. Since the program began four years ago, the total GEA reduction in school aid for GCSD amounts to about $16 million and the district is expected to see an additional reduction (yet to be determined) in the 2014-15 school year.

 

 

 

2013-14 tax rates set

Learn more

 

Understanding New York's new property tax levy "cap"

Want to learn about the property tax levy "cap" and what it means for GCSD? Visit the "Understanding New York's new property tax levy cap" Web page or watch the brief video below:

 

 

 

Be an advocate for students in the Guilderland Central School District

Advocacy takes many forms. It could be a note to an elected official, a comment made during a public forum, a letter to a newspaper editor or formal testimony at public hearings. It could be as simple as chatting with neighbors to clear up misunderstandings about education issues or sharing education-related stories with a local civic organization during monthly meetings. Learn more about advocacy and how you can get involved

 

Contact information for our elected officials

Do you have a concern about the new tax “cap” law? Do you want to ask your local representative for mandate relief? Would you like to see education aid restored? If so, now is the time to act! All voters can have a “say” in the laws and regulations affecting our schools by contacting their elected officials to share their opinions. The more officials hear from their constituents, the better. View contact information for our elected officials

 

Federal Mandates on Local Education: Costs and Consequences
Yes, it’s a Race, but is it in the Right Direction?

A new report report recently released by the Center for Research, Regional Education, and Outreach at the State University of New York at New Paltz takes a closer look at how the federal Race to the Top Initiative has dramatically changed both how we educate our children and how we fund public K-12 education in our state. Read the full report (PDF)

 

Not sure how to use the electronic voting machines?

Once again, GCSD will be using electronic voting machines at all polling locations. Not sure what to expect? Watch a brief video to learn more 

 

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