Social Studies Curriculum – High School

The Social Studies Department strives to ensure that all students are prepared to become active, productive, informed, responsible, and efficacious citizens. Guilderland students are required to take four Social Studies credits that reflect Global History and Geography, U.S. History and Government, Economics, and Public Policy. Not only will students engage with important historical content and related-concepts, but students will also leverage their literacy skills in the areas of close reading, argument and explanatory writing, and using textual evidence. In addition to learning core discipline-specific lenses, students will also focus on building skills to effectively evaluate primary and secondary sources to better understanding the historical past. Additionally, students will also learn how to develop inquiry questions, conduct research, and communicate their findings as active, informed citizens. 

1001 Global History & Geography 9 – Honors 

Students will complete the 9th grade Regents Global curriculum. In addition, this course emphasizes a progressive increase in text-based primary source documents; rigourous evidencebased historical research, interpretation and analysis; advanced application of academic discipline-specific Social Studies vocabulary, concepts, and skills; and research-based historical writing to explore and evaluate enduring issues. This course requires a more frequent and longer reading assignments of primary and secondary sources. 

1002 Global History & Geography 9 – Regents 

The Global history program is a comprehensive study of global societies through the use of the social sciences of anthropology, archeology, economics, geography, history, law, philosophy, political science, and sociology. The course of study will include the following topics and timeline: (1) The First Civilizations [10,000 BCE-630 CE]; (2) Classical Societies [600 BCE – 900 CE]; (3) An Age of Expanding Connections [500-1500]; and (4) Global Interactions [1400- 1750]. This course also emphasizes the application of Social Studies-specific skills such as document analysis, developing argument-based claims supported by document and historical evidence, and discipline-specific inquiry 

1012 Global History & Geography/English 9 – Aligned 

Grade 9 Global History and English classes are aligned so that students are engaged in rigorous, project-based instruction with opportunity for collaborative learning experiences. This course may be taken for Honors credit if the student demonstrates mastery of designated performance standards. 

1021 Global History & Geography 10 – Honors 

Students will complete the 10th grade Regents Global curriculum. In addition, this course emphasizes a progressive increase in text-based primary source documents; rigourous evidencebased historical research, interpretation and analysis; advanced application of academic discipline-specific Social Studies vocabulary, concepts, and skills; and research-based historical writing to explore and evaluate enduring issues. This course requires a more frequent and longer reading assignments of primary and secondary sources. Students taking this course will be prepared to take the required NYS Global History and Geography Regents Examination in June. 

1022 Global History & Geography 10 – Regents 

This program is a continuation of Global History 9 and will culminate in a Regents exam. The course of study will include the following topics and timeline: (1) The World in 1750; (2) An Age of Revolutions, Industrialization, and Empires [1750-1914]; (3) Crisis and Achievement in the 20th Century [1914–Present]; and (4) Contemporary Issues. This course also emphasizes the application of Social Studies-specific skills such as document analysis, developing argument-based claims supported by document and historical evidence, and discipline-specific inquiry. Students taking this course will be prepared to take the required NYS G 

1033 Global History & Geography 10 – Focus 

Students will study the Regents level Global History and Geography 10 curriculum, but in smaller class sizes to provide a more structured, supportive learning environment. Students taking this course will be prepared to take the required NYS Global History and Geography Regents Examination in June. 

1034 Global History & Geography/English 10 – Aligned 

Grade 10 Global History and English classes are aligned so that students are engaged in rigorous, project-based instruction with opportunity for collaborative learning experiences. This course may be taken for Honors credit if the student demonstrates mastery of designated performance standards. Students taking this course will be prepared to take the required NYS Global History and Geography Regents Examination in June 

1042 United States History & Govt. – Regents 

This course provides an in-depth study of American History from 1600 to the present. The Presidency, Congress and Supreme Court are examined, as well as the topics of immigration, foreign policy, economics and American culture. This course also emphasizes the application of Social Studies-specific skills such as document analysis, developing argument-based claims supported by document and historical evidence, and discipline-specific inquiry. This course will prepare students to take the United States History and Government Regents Examination in June. 

1901 Advanced Placement European History 

AP European History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university European history course. In AP European History, students investigate significant events, individuals, developments and processes in four historical periods from approximately 1450 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical comparisons; and utilizing reasoning about contextualization, causation, and continuity and change over time. The course also provides six themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: interaction of Europe and the world; poverty and prosperity; objective knowledge and subjective visions; states and other institutions of power; individual and society; and national and European identity. All students taking this course will be required to take both the AP European History Examination in May and the Gl .

1041 United States History & Govt. – Honors 

Students will complete the 11th grade Regents U.S. History curriculum. In addition, this course emphasizes a progressive increase in text-based primary source documents; rigourous evidence-based historical research, interpretation and analysis; advanced application of academic discipline-specific Social Studies vocabulary, concepts, and skills; and research-based historical writing to explore and evaluate enduring issues. This course requires a more frequent and longer reading assignments of primary and secondary sources. This course will prepare students to take the United States History and Government Regents Examination in June. 

1053 United States History & Govt. – Focus 

Students will study the Regents level United States History and Government 11 curriculum, but with a smaller class size to provide a more structured, supportive learning environment. This course will prepare students to take the United States History and Government Regents Examination in June.

1060 United States History & Govt./English 11 – Aligned 

Grade 11 U.S. History and English classes are aligned so that students are engaged in rigorous, project-based instruction with opportunity for collaborative learning experiences, which center on the cooperative discovery of the significant history of the peoples of America (primarily the United States) through the reading of diverse historical literature as well as a wide variety of nonfiction material. There is a great emphasis on the use of learning journals, reading independently, and preparing classroom presentations and projects, both individually and in groups. Completion of a summer project is required for this course. This course may be taken for Honors credit if the student demonstrates mastery of designated performance standards. This course will prepare students to take the United States History and Government Regents Examination in June. 

1911 Advanced Placement U.S. History 

AP U.S. History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university U.S. history course. In AP U.S. History students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in nine historical periods from approximately 1491 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; making historical comparisons; utilizing reasoning about contextualization, causation, and continuity and change over time; and developing historical arguments. The course also provides seven themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: American and national identity; migration and settlement; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; America in the world; geography and the environment; and culture and society. All students taking this course will be required to take both the AP U.S. History Examination in May and the United States History and Government Regents Examination in June.  

1153 Economics – Core 

The course includes an overview of economic principles, the role of each factor of production (land, labor, capital, and enterprise), the role of the consumer, government involvement in economic planning, the study of economic growth and the analysis of the factors of growth and the study of money, banking and current problems. 

1403 Economics – Focus 

This course includes an overview of economic principles, the role of each factor of production (land, labor, capital, and entrepreneurship), the role of the consumer, government involvement in economic planning, the study of economic growth, the analysis of the factors of growth, money, banking, International Trade/Competition Investment and current problems. Reading, writing and research activities are stressed. Macro and microeconomics are taught in this course. Class size is smaller to provide a more supportive and cooperative environment 

1062 Economics – Regents 

This course includes an overview of economic principles, the role of each factor of production (land, labor, capital, and entrepreneurship), the role of the consumer, government involvement in economic planning, the study of economic growth, the analysis of the factors of growth, money, banking, International Trade/Competition Investment and current problems. Reading, writing and research activities are stressed. Macro and microeconomics are taught in this course.

1721 Syracuse University Project Advance Economics 

This course is an intro to Micro and Macro Economics and an examination of Western economic thought. More specifically, the course starts with Micro Economics and a one-person society before examining how people make choices, especially when other individuals are introduced and resources become scarce. The course continues into Macro Economics and leads students to today’s complex, industrialized society. Students will examine the role government plays in creating and solving global economic challenges as well as learning how to become a more engaged economic citizen by gaining a better understanding of fiscal policy, financial markets, and the role of the consumer. This course is based on ECN 203: Economic Ideas & Issues at Syracuse University. Students may earn three college credit hours upon successful completion of class. 

1802 Public Policy – Regents 

This course centers on government structure, the policy process, and societal issues. Students will explore other public policy issues through individual and group projects. This course also emphasizes the application of Social Studies-specific skills such as document analysis, developing argument-based claims supported by document and historical evidence and discipline-specific inquiry 

1811 Public Policy – Honors 

Students will complete the 12th grade Public Policy curriculum. In addition, this course emphasizes a progressive increase in text-based primary source documents; rigourous evidence-based research, interpretation and analysis; advanced application of academic discipline-specific Social Studies vocabulary, concepts, and skills; and research-based writing to explore and evaluate enduring issues. This course requires a more frequent and longer reading assignments of primary and secondary sources. Projects are assigned throughout the semester. 

1823 Public Policy – Core 

In this course students will study government and societal issues. They will learn the structure of government and how policies are made. In addition, they will analyze several societal problems and discuss possible policies. Students will explore other public policy issues through individual and group projects. 

1803 Public Policy – Focus 

This course researches the government’s role in managing societal problems. Students are required to complete many hands-on activities and projects to reinforce classroom concepts. Class size is smaller to provide a more supportive and cooperative environment. 

1931 Advanced Placement U.S. Gov’t & Politics 

AP U.S. Gov’t & Politics introduces students to key political ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the political culture of the U.S. The course examines politically significant concepts and themes, through which students learn to apply disciplinary reasoning, assess causes and consequences of political events, and interpret data to develop evidence-based arguments. More specifically, this course provides a thorough examination of the U.S. government’s structure and operation, political systems and the policy process. Students will use primary and secondary information to critically evaluate general propositions about government and politics. This also includes presenting basic and relevant information, as well as creating sustained written arguments pertaining to topics such as voting and elections, public opinion polls, federalism and the effect of ideology on the political process. Students must take AP test in May 

1502 Psychology 

This course attempts to answer questions students have about themselves and other people. Topics include sleep and dreams, learning processes, child development, adolescent psychology, personality, stress, abnormal psychology, altered states of consciousness, social psychology, marriage and research design 

1612 Criminal Justice (SCCC) 

Introductory high school level course designed to teach a basic understanding of the field of Criminal Justice. This course provides the philosophical and historical background of the agencies that compose the criminal justice system. It focuses on the development of justice and law, crime and punishment, the administration of laws, the agencies function, career orientation and public policy. Additional topics include crime in America, policing, the court system and corrections. A visit to a state prison and many class speakers are incorporated into the course. This course is is based on CRJ 113: Intro to Criminal Justice at SCCC. Students may earn three college credit hours upon successful completion of class 

1601 Social Problems (HVCC) 

This course is a study of major American social problems with emphasis on their nature, scope, causes, consequences and possible solutions. Major topics covered include: political, educational and familial problems, inequality and poverty, environmental problems, crime and mental illness. This course is based on SOCL 110: Social Problems at HVCC. Students may earn three college credit hours upon successful completion of class. 

1613 Conflict, Justice, & Peace 

TA study of major American military engagements (at home and abroad) to better understand the purpose, consequence and experience of military conflict vis-a-vis ethical considerations, human rights, national sovereignty, micro and macro-level tactics and strategies, and technology. Major topics may include, but are not limited to: the experience of a soldier, tactics and strategies, war crimes, the purpose of war and conflict, civilians, the military industry complex, national politics, technology, etc. Additionally, the aforementioned topics will be examined through the following American historical periods: The Revolutionary War, The Civil War, The Spanish-American War, WWI, WWII, The Cold War, Vietnam, the Persian Gulf Conflict of the 1990s, and the modern War Against Terror, among other historical periods. 

1622 Current Issues in Criminal Justice (SCCC) 

This course is designed to allow study and discussion of those relevant issues of most current concern affecting components of the criminal justice system. Such issues as hiring practices, community relations, court decisions, and the impact of the mass media may be explored in relationship to the administration of justice in America. This course is is based on CRJ 233: Current Issues in Criminal Justice at SCCC. Students may earn three college credit hours upon successful completion of this class. 

 

 

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