GCSD Professional Development Plan 2019-20

I. Introduction
II. NYSED Regulations
III. Philosophy
IV. Needs Assessment
V. Goals/Implementation
VI. Mentor Plan (GEMS)

2019-20 Professional Development Committee

  • Demian Singleton, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction
  • Kimberly Kern, Teaching Assistant
  • Mary Schmitz, Teaching Assistant
  • Keir Aspin, Teacher
  • Tim Fry, Teacher
  • Jenny Politano, Teacher
  • Lindsey Fargnoli, G.E.M.S. Coordinator
  • Karen LaJeunesse, Teacher
  • Amy Knapp, School Counselor
  • Beth Bini, Principal
  • Irene Nardelli, Teaching Assistant
  • Mary Sandoval, Teacher
  • Rachel Anderson, Instructional Administrator

Note: An appendix of Forms can be obtained by contacting building leadership.

I. Introduction

This Professional Development Plan for the Guilderland Central School District describes a vision for adult learning that is collaborative, continuous, embedded in daily practice and focused on student achievement. This model builds on and strengthens the successes already evident in the district. We strive to strengthen this culture that supports adult learning by providing a framework that affords every educator an opportunity to enrich his/her practice.

Throughout this document, we reference the ultimate goal of professional development: improved student learning. While being mindful of that core purpose, it is important to acknowledge the additional benefits of this comprehensive professional development plan:

  • improving job satisfaction
  • improving our ability to recruit and retain new educators
  • increasing our knowledge of innovative practices
  • meeting the NYSED requirements for professional development planning
  • promoting shared decision-making and inclusive leadership

The scope of professional development (PD) in Guilderland will not be limited to attending a workshop or participating in a seminar with a visiting expert. Professional development will consistently be an ongoing process that involves sustainable improvement in student learning and instructional practices. This requires evaluation of student performance and teacher self-assessment, identifying possible courses of action, testing new approaches, assessing results and then beginning the process anew. This work is best done with colleagues and not alone, because each of us is limited by our own perception of the problem and knowledge of possible solutions. 

Although professional development can be defined in a number of different ways, we prefer the description Judith Warren Little gives in an article entitled “Organizing Schools for Teacher Learning”. Little describes professional development as “a focus on and responsibility for student learning and the formation of professional community inside and outside the school” (1996, p.1).

Linda Darling-Hammond and Milbrey W. McLaughlin define professional development as “deepening teachers’ understanding about the teaching/ learning process and the students they teach,” which “must begin with pre-service education and continue throughout a teacher’s career.”  They state that “effective professional development involves teachers both as learners and teachers, and allows them to struggle with the uncertainties that accompany each role” (1996, p. 203).  

In the Guilderland Central School District, our approach to professional development is to make certain that all educators have the best possible skills, content knowledge, and preparation for teaching.  The needs of learners in the twenty-first century demand innovative, progressive, and cutting-edge instruction.  As such, the quality of our professional development programs are influenced by a variety of factors. The National Staff Development Council recognizes these variables as the essential standards for professional development in education.  The standards are:

CONTEXT

Learning Communities:  Staff development that improves the learning of all students organizes adults into learning communities whose goals are aligned with those of the school and district. 

Leadership:  Staff development that improves the learning of all students requires skillful school and district leaders who guide continuous instructional improvement.

Resources:  Staff development that improves the learning of all students requires resources to support adult learning and collaboration.  

PROCESS 

Data-Driven:  Staff development that improves the learning of all students uses disaggregated student data to determine adult learning priorities, monitor progress, and help sustain continuous improvement. 

Evaluation:  Staff development that improves the learning of all students uses multiple sources of information to guide improvement and demonstrate its impact. 

Researched-Based:  Staff development that improves the learning of all students prepares educators to apply research to decision making.

Design:  Staff development that improves the learning of all students uses learning strategies appropriate to the intended goal. 

Learning:  Staff development that improves the learning of all students applies knowledge about human learning and change. 

Collaboration:  Staff development that improves learning of all students provides educators with the knowledge and skills to collaborate.

CONTENT 

Equity:  Staff development that improves the learning of all students prepares educators to understand and appreciate all students, create safe, orderly, and supportive learning environments, and hold high expectations for students’ academic achievement.

Quality Teaching:  Staff development that improves the learning of all students deepens educators’ content knowledge, provides them with research-based instructional strategies to assist students in meeting rigorous academic standards, and prepares them to use various types of classroom assessments appropriately. 

Family Involvement:  Staff development that improves the learning of all students provides educators with knowledge and skills to involve families and other stakeholders appropriately.                                                                                             

Quality professional development is a dynamic and fluid process. If appropriate structures are in place (context), a variety of best practices (processes) are used, and appropriate knowledge and skill acquisition are occurring (content), then professional development will impact student achievement.

II. New York State Education Department Regulations and Requirements

This Professional Development Plan meets the requirements of the 100.2 (dd) Regulations of the State of New York. The purpose of this plan is to improve student learning by providing meaningful, focused, professional development opportunities that are aligned with the Learning Standards of New York State (NYS). Additionally, public school districts are required to have a professional development plan which describes how it will provide all of its teachers, teaching assistants and long-term substitute teachers with substantial professional development opportunities and how it will provide its professional certificate holders with opportunities to maintain such certificates in good standing based upon successfully completing 175 hours of professional development for teachers and 75 hours for teaching assistants every five years.

Every Student Succeeds Act

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) has updated and strengthened the definition of professional development.

In the “general provisions” section of ESSA, which contains requirements and definitions of terms that are used throughout the law, is a definition of PD that guides, states, districts, and schools as they plan and provide professional learning programs. Important concepts and provisions in the federal definition highlight:

  • First, the definition emphasizes that PD is for all educators – principals, other school leaders, support personnel, paraprofessionals, and early childhood educators – to help students succeed in a well-rounded education and to meet state academic standards. ESSA also eliminates No Child Left Behind’s focus on “core academic subjects,” which expands the use of federal funds funds for PD to include teachers of every subject.
  • Second, and directly quoting the federal definition, PD needs to be “sustained (not stand-alone, 1-day, or short-term workshops), intensive, collaborative, job-embedded, data-driven, and classroom-focused.” It is notable and rare for federal law to specifically say what something should NOT be. In this case, ESSA is trying to eliminate federal funding for the ineffective forms of PD that have been too prevalent over the years.
  • Third, the PD definition goes on to emphasize several other important points, including that PD should be part of school and district improvement plans; that it provides educators training in the effective use of technology; that it be evaluated for its impact on teacher effectiveness and student achievement; and that it be personalized “to address the educator’s specific needs.

III. Philosophy

The purpose of the Guilderland Central School District’s professional development plan is to improve the quality of teaching and learning, and to directly align this plan with our continued commitment to putting students first, professionalism, instructional technology, respect for all, high expectations, learning standards, and shared decision-making.  Professional development is a multi-faceted, information-based process that is strategically planned to provide individual, school and district solutions to targeted areas in need of improvement or strengthening.  Our professional development program is intentionally designed to build skills and capacities for improvement through comprehensive and ongoing learning.  We believe that sound and practical professional development programs are positive links to establishing effective instructional practices that will enhance the knowledge of curriculum content, design and delivery.

Research in the field of education and professional development has revealed a series of characteristics and practices observed in exemplary programs.  These principles focus a school district’s attention and resources on professional development strategies for improving student learning and achievement.  In addition, there are a variety of conditions that are salient when implementing sound and effective professional development programs.  As such, professional development in Guilderland will:

  • reflect a commitment to ongoing and continuous professional development that is based on the analyses of multiple sources of data
  • include sufficient time and follow up support provided to staff to master new content and strategies
  • ensure that content of professional development focuses on what students need to know and be able to do and is explicitly linked to the effect on student learning
  • make certain that content of professional development will provide opportunities to gain an understanding of the theory underlying the knowledge (context) and skills being learned
  • support the implementation of best practices as evidenced by research
  • provide both a focus on instructional repertoire and content-specific skills. Instructional improvement requires that teachers possess a deeper understanding of both their academic disciplines and of specific pedagogical approaches
  • impart opportunities to explore, question, and debate in order to integrate new ideas into classroom practice
  • maintain a differentiated and developmental approach to meet individual and district needs relating to the teaching and learning process
  • involve teachers in the identification of what they need to learn and in the development of the learning experiences in which they will be involved
  • include the use of flexible times and models are essential for successful implementation of professional development

Although professionals in Guilderland are continually improving their craft and honing their skills through their own self-improvement efforts, systemic change and growth requires collective and sustained efforts.  Our comprehensive professional development plan promotes student achievement by providing learning opportunities for staff that is aligned with major school and/or district goals identified through regular needs assessments and a professional development planning process.  The professional development planning process is:

Identify school/district educational goals

  • Review existing educational goals for state, district and schools
  • Analyze student achievement data: past, present, projected trends
  • Diagnose areas of student need
  • Establish improvement with measureable goals expressed in terms of desired outcomes and within the context of the learning standards and district’s priorities whenever possible

Plan for implementation

    • Outline flexible and integrated professional development strategies and activities that address the needs as identified through school and district goals
    • Identify sources of expertise to assist with identified needs and goals
    • Select PD content and process at each level (district, school, team, or individual)
    • Identify sources and uses of financial resources

    Implement professional development strategies

    • Integrate learning models that provide choice, differentiated learning, sustained collaboration and ongoing support
    • Incorporate best practices into teaching, learning and leadership
    • Identify critical factors for successful implementation

    Monitor progress

    • Identify success measures for professional development activities
    • Identify data sources and gathering method for each measure
    • Plan for articulation of findings
    • Keep records of PD implementation, participation and feedback
    • Administer feedback surveys and collectively analyze results

    IV. Needs Assessment

    As part of the ongoing professional development planning cycle, the Guilderland Central School District reviews multiple sources. The following items may be analyzed annually to determine the focus and content of the professional development plan:

    Student Achievement Data

    • Measures of Interim progress (ESSA Accountability Reports)
    • NYS and District Assessments (e.g., 3-8 testing and Regents exams)
    • Disaggregated Student Achievement Data
    • Report Cards
    • VADIR/DASA Reports
    • Supervisor and Department Data Analyses and Recommendations
    • Counseling and Social Work Records
    • Student Attendance and Discipline reports
    • Graduation and Drop-out Rates
    • Special Education Identifications and Annual Reviews
    • NYS Learning Standards
    • College Placement Rates
    • Academic Intervention Services and RtI Records
    • Fountas and Pinnell Elementary Benchmark Reading Assessments
    • College Boards (AP, SAT)

    Surveys

    • Professional Development Needs Assessment via Thought Exchange
    • Professional Development and GEMS Evaluation/Feedback Surveys

    Additional Data Sources

    • BEDS Data
    • Longitudinal Student Performance Data
    • Teacher Retention and Turnover Rates
    • Professional Performance Reviews and Observations/Evaluations
    • Program Evaluations
    • Feedback from Curriculum and Building Cabinets
    • SED Regulations and Mandates
    • Mentor Program Evaluations
    • eDoctrina Student Profiles

    2019 GCSD Staff Development Needs Assessment (Thought Exchange)

    During the spring of 2019, the GCSD Professional Development Cabinet facilitated a Thought Exchange to assess professional learning needs across the district.  All instructional staff members were invited to contribute to this Thought Exchange.  A Thought Exchange enables participants to share their unique ideas and thoughts and to rate the thoughts added by others. Critical themes were identified based on the frequency (number) of thoughts entered for certain topics.  Additionally, the Cabinet was able to further prioritize themes based on the ratings given to each thought or idea.

    Topics in order of frequency from most to least:

    • Co-teaching
    • Learning standards
    • Mental health
    • Professional collaboration
    • Technology integration
    • Supporting struggling learners
    • Teaching strategies
    • Behavior management
    • Equity 
    • Special education
    • Literacy
    • Cultural responsive practices
    • Poverty/disadvantaged
    • ENL

    Rating of Themes/Topics

    • Mental Health
    • Behavior Management
    • Equity
    • Poverty/disadvantaged
    • Co-teaching
    • Professional Collaboration
    • Cultural responsive practices
    • Supporting struggling learners
    • Special education
    • Technology integration
    • ENL
    • Teaching strategies
    • Learning standards
    • Other 
    • Literacy

    V. Goals and Implementation Plans for 2019-20 Professional Development

    The following professional development goals and objectives have been identified for the 2019-2020 school year.  The data collected, generated and analyzed by the Guilderland Central School District in conjunction with district and school level plans will support the goals, objectives, strategies, activities, and evaluations of this professional development plan.

    The district goals, and each of the objectives designed to achieve such goals were identified through completion of needs assessments, review of student achievement data and consideration of critical program shifts and new or revised curricula.  Additionally, recurring and ongoing annual commitments to professional development are noted.

    Goal #1:  Increase access to job-embedded professional learning grounded in collaborative structures and teacher leadership.

    Objective 1.1:  Create and/or strengthen the impact of Professional Learning Teams at all levels. 

    Essential Question: How can Professional Learning Teams and job-embedded professional development be used to establish a cycle of continuous improvement?

    Activities & Strategies

    • Establish Professional Learning Teams as essential and foundational structures charged with developing a vision for continuous professional learning aligned to school and district needs, goals and priorities.  Each Professional Learning Team will:
      • Set Professional Learning Goals and establish a shared vision for professional learning
      • Design and annual Professional Learning Plan aligned with district and school goals, student needs, and desired outcomes
      • Align resources/staff to shared vision
      • Assess the Impact of Professional activities
      • Sustain implementation of job-embedded professional learning programs
      • Assess
    • Maximize teacher leadership through addition of program leader positions at all levels and or most disciplines
    • Provide collaborative, and sustained learning opportunities aligned with school and district goals
    • Engage learning teams in analysis of educator, student and school data to identify learning needs
    • Provide job-embedded coaching and/or teacher leadership other forms of assistance to support transfer of professional learning to practice and application
    • Engage professional learning teams visioning and planning for professional learning at each school and for the district
    • Create a toolkit to assist schools and the district in establishing their vision and structures for professional learning
    • Maximize support of new teachers via GEMS, New Teacher Roundtables, and other collaborative strategies

    Continuing Teacher and Leader Effectiveness (CTLE)

    The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) has redefined professional development has been to ensure that professional development activities are “sustained (not stand-alone, 1-day, or short term workshops), intensive, collaborative, job-embedded, data-driven, and classroom-focused.” This goal and related activities will build a sustainable structure forged upon teacher leadership and collaboration.  A new commitment to Professional Learning Teams at all schools and the district will provide educators (including teachers, principals, other school leaders, specialized instructional support personnel, and paraprofessionals with the knowledge and skills necessary to enable students to succeed in a well-rounded education and to meet the challenging State academic standards

    CTLE Providers

    • District Instructional Leaders/Administrators and Curriculum Cabinets
    • School and District Professional Learning Teams
    • Teacher/Program Leaders
    • Literacy Coaches
    • Mentors

    Action Plan

    Inputs

    Form Professional Learning Teams for each school

    Evidence

    Representatives selected to collaboratively plan for job-embedded PD aligned to school and district goals.

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, GTA President, GEMS Coordinator, Building Principals, Instructional Administrators, Teacher Leaders, Curriculum Cabinets

    Timeline

    July 2019

    Inputs

    Develop Professional Learning Planning tools and forms

    Evidence

    Planning documents and guidance

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction

    Timeline

    September 2019

    Inputs

    School-based Professional Learning Teams develop Professional Learning Plan aligned to district and school goals

    Evidence

    Completed planning documents, meeting agendas and minutes

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Building Principals, Instructional Administrators, Curriculum, Teacher Leaders

    Timeline

    September 2019

    NSDC Standards Alignment

    Context

    • Resources
    • Learning Communities
    • Leadership

    Process

    • Research-Based
    • Data-Driven
    • Learning
    • Evaluation
    • Collaboration

    Content

    • Quality Teaching

    GCSD Professional Growth and Evaluation Domain

    • Instruction

    Goal #2: Continue to align programs practices with NYSED Requirements, including any new or revised State Learning Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects and for Mathematics.

    Objective 2.1: Continue to train instructional leaders and faculty in all frameworks, practices, and requirements of the NYS Next Generation Learning Standards including Frameworks for English Language Arts (ELA), Mathematics, Social Studies and Science. 

    Essential Question: How can common learning standards be used to inform instruction and develop in all students the practice skills and content knowledge required for college and career readiness in multiple disciplines?

    Activities & Strategies

    • Update curricula and programs for alignment to NYS Next Generation Learning Standards for ELA/Literacy, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies
    • Provide collaborative learning opportunities to support implementation of NYS Next Generation Learning Standards for ELA/Literacy, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies.
    • Provide focused training and collaboration opportunities for collective understanding of Next Generation Science practices and Cross-Cutting Concepts
    • Professional learning/training for implementation of new K-5 mathematics program (Investigations)
    • Professional learning/training for implementation of new elementary science modules (Smithsonian)
    • Professional Learning/training for implementation of elementary Reading, Writing, and Phonics Units of Study
    • Develop web-based platform for documentation of standards-aligned units-of-study and curriculum overviews
    • Continue GHS curriculum review process

    Continuing Teacher and Leader Effectiveness (CTLE)

    Teachers and leaders will continue analysis of NYS learning standards for strategic implementation.  Instructional Administrators, Principals, and Teacher Leaders work closely with District Leaders and Curriculum Cabinets to provide curriculum-alignment efforts to ensure that all teachers are informed of standards and are prepared to demonstrate improved pedagogical and instructional skills in their respective areas of expertise.  Additionally, teachers and leaders are provided focused professional development around such learning standards.

    CTLE Providers

    • District Instructional Leaders/Administrators and Curriculum Cabinets
    • Capital Region BOCES
    • Questar III BOCES
    • Pearson Professional Developers (Investigations)

    Action Plan

    Inputs

    Build collective understanding and capacity to implement NG standards and frameworks and instill a common language for implementation and vertical articulation

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts- (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, online collaborations, guidance documents, etc.)

    Observation and feedback surveys and notes as applied, GCSD web site for curriculum documentation

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Instructional Administrators, Teacher Leaders, Curriculum Cabinets

    Timeline

    2019-20

    Inputs

    Monitor capacity for full implementation of Next Generation Standards

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, etc.), Surveys

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Building Principals, Instructional Administrators, Teacher Leaders, Curriculum Cabinets

    Timeline

    Ongoing

    Inputs

    Support faculty in implementation of Next Generation aligned curricula (e.g. Investigations, Smithsonian) instructional models and modules/units

    Evidence

    Curriculum documents (and web site) and organizing frameworks aligned with learning standards and inclusive of aligned units/modules for implementation

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction,, Instructional Administrators, Curriculum Cabinets, Data Coordinator, Teacher Leaders

    Timeline

    Ongoing

    NSDC Standards Alignment

    Context

    • Resources
    • Learning Communities
    • Leadership

    Process

    • Research-Based
    • Data-Driven
    • Learning
    • Evaluation
    • Collaboration

    Content

    • Quality Teaching

    GCSD Professional Growth and Evaluation Domain

    • Instruction
    • Assessment

    Goal #3: Continue to support the integration of advance technology applications to improve instruction, enhance student engagement and maximize learning in a 21st century classroom.

    Objective 3.1: Train instructional staff in the application of instructional technologies (1:1 Chromebook program, Google Apps, etc.)

    Essential Question: How can effective applications of instructional technologies enhance student engagement, learning and achievement?

    Activities & Strategies

    • Provide a variety of opportunities for staff to develop technology skills for instruction, communication, and presentation
    • Expand a cohort program whereby GCSD teachers are able to become Google Certified Educators Level 1
    • Provide new opportunities for staff to develop instructional skills enhanced by use of technologies
    • Provide staff with opportunity to learn current advancements in web-based technology resources (Google Classroom and Google Apps for Education, Chromebooks, Extensions and Add-ons, etc)

    Continuing Teacher and Leader Effectiveness (CTLE)

    Teachers and leaders will continue to prepare for implementation of the district’s Technology Plan, which focuses on ubiquitous and necessary integration of instructional technologies and applications.  The expectations and practices are outlined well in a rigorous K-12 Scope and Sequence which serves as a foundation for professional development activities.  Significant focus has been placed on collaboration and communication enhanced by technology in and beyond the classroom. Administrators, Principals, and Teacher Leaders have worked closely with District Leaders to establish a deep understanding of the technology plan and pending initiatives (e.g. 1:1 Chromebook program).  Additionally, teachers and leaders have been provided focused professional development by our Coordinator for Instructional Technology, NYSCATE, ISTE, and Capital Region BOCES,

    CTLE Providers

    • District Instructional Leaders and Administrators
    • Coordinator for Instructional Technology (Natalia LeMoyne- Google Certified Trainer and Innovator)
    • Technology Curriculum Cabinet
    • Capital Region BOCES
    • NYSCATE- http://nyscate.org/aboutus.cfm

    Action Plan

    Inputs

    Successful and consistent offerings to accomplish objective

    Evidence

    Participation in Model Schools, District, BOCES and other programs for training in advance technology applications

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, etc.)

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Building Principals, Instructional Administrators, Coordinator for Instructional Technologies, Technology Liaisons,

    Timeline

    2019-20

    Inputs

    Frequent consultation with site-based Technology Liaisons followed by turnkey training and sharing at grade level and faculty meetings

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, etc.)

    Observation/feedback notes from principals and instructional administrators

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Building Principals, Instructional Administrators, Coordinator for Instructional Technologies, Technology Liaisons

    Timeline

    Monthly (minimum)

    Inputs

    Identify and share exemplar uses of technology for instruction and learning. 

    Evidence

    Inclusion of exemplar practices and applications in curriculum scope and sequence

    Documentation of support for peer observations and modeling of applications

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Building Principals, Instructional Administrators, Coordinator for Instructional Technologies, Technology Liaisons,

    Timeline

    Ongoing

    Inputs

    Use of access and usage data to identify preferred technologies

    Evidence

    Building calendars for use sign out and use of hardware and resources

    Observation/feedback notes from principals and instructional administrators

    System report tools (e.g., MyLearningPlan Google Admin)

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Building Principals, Instructional Administrators, Coordinator for Instructional Technologies, Technology Liaisons

    Timeline

    2019-20

    Inputs

    Establish 2019-20 Cohorts for completion of requirements to earn Google Certified Educator Level 1 Certification for teachers

    Evidence

    Teacher completion of required courses, lessons, and activities

    Documentation of participation, including completed projects

    Rate of completion

    Responsibility

    Coordinator for Instructional Technology-  Natalia LeMoyne

    Timeline

    2019-20 (2 cohorts)

    NSDC Standards Alignment

    Context

    • Resources
    • Learning Communities

    Process

    • Research-Based
    • Design
    • Learning

    Content

    • Quality Teaching

    GCSD Professional Growth and Evaluation Domain

    • Instruction
    • Assessment
    • Communication

    Objective 3.2:

    Provide professional development and student programs designed to inform safe and responsible use of social media.

    Essential Question: How can GCSD inform all stakeholders of the critical elements of digital citizenship and effective and responsible use of social media position students for success in school and life?

    Activities & Strategies

    • Provide a variety of opportunities for staff to develop the skills needed for effective use of social media and on line tools
    • Provide administrators and clerical staff with necessary skills for advanced communications using social media

    Continuing Teacher and Leader Effectiveness (CTLE)

    T

    Teachers and leaders will continue to prepare for implementation of the district’s Technology Plan, which focuses on ubiquitous and necessary integration of instructional technologies and applications.  The expectations and practices are outlined well in a rigorous K-12 Scope and Sequence which serves as a foundation for professional development activities.  Embedded within the Scope and Sequence are an array of application, strategies and expectations for instruction on safe and constructive use of social media.  Administrators, Principals, and Teacher Leaders have worked closely with District Leaders to establish a deep understanding of the critical need for instruction of digital citizenship and cyber safety.  Additionally, teachers and leaders have been provided focused professional development by our Coordinator for Instructional Technology, NYSCATE, and Capital Region BOCES.

    CTLE Providers

    • District Instructional Leaders and Administrators
    • Coordinator for Instructional Technology (Natalia LeMoyne)
    • Technology Curriculum Cabinet
    • Library and Media Specialists
    • Capital Region BOCES
    • NYSCATE- http://nyscate.org/aboutus.cfm

    Others TBD

    Action Plan

    Inputs

    Plan and facilitate focused student assemblies on Digital Citizenship and online safety

    Evidence

    Building level assemblies

    Responsibility

    Building Principals, Coordinator for Instructional Technology, Technology Leadership Council, Technology Liaisons

    Timeline

    Fall 2019-20

    Inputs

    Technology applications-Administrator and teacher professional development sessions

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, etc.)

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent Instruction, Instructional Administrators, Technology Leadership Council, Technology Liaisons

    Timeline

    Ongoing

    Inputs

    Frequent guided-work sessions for sustained training and support

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, etc.)

    Responsibility

    Technology Leadership Council, Technology Liaisons

    Timeline

    Ongoing

    NSDC Standards Alignment

    Context

    • Resources
    • Learning Communities

    Process

    • Research-Based

    GCSD Professional Growth and Evaluation Domain

    • Instruction
    • Communication

    Goal #4: Ensure that all members of the Guilderland professional staff develop the skills, knowledge and strategies to effectively implement curriculum and best instructional practices.

    Objective 4.1: Promote literacy development K-12 and in all content areas

    Essential Question: How can reading and writing across the disciplines positively affect learning and achievement?

    Activities & Strategies

    • Sustain long-term commitment to professional development in literacy via targeted learning of best instructional practices
    • Continue to support transition to Calkins Units of Study for Reading, Writing and Phonics
    • Continue to support elementary teachers’ administration and use of Fountas and Pinnell Benchmark Reading Assessments and Leveled Literacy for Intervention for SBST Progress Monitoring, for diagnostic purposes
    • Continue to strengthen collaborative structures for literacy coaching at the elementary level (LES).
    • Maintain strong partnerships with higher education and research centers (e.g., Lesley University, SUNY Cortland, Ohio State University, University at Albany)
    • Facilitate Curriculum-Alignment with continued focus on workshop structures and alignment with SBST plans, Next Generation Standards, curriculum calendars, etc.
    • Expand use of digital portfolios as an additional tool for model reading and writing progress monitoring- District implementation of Seesaw
    • Facilitate a Reading Recovery Training Class with focus on Literacy Lessons for K-5 special ed. and ENL teachers
    • Initiate focused training of school-based Literacy Coaches facilitated by District Trainers

    Continuing Teacher and Leader Effectiveness (CTLE)

    Teachers and leaders will continue analysis of NYS learning standards for strategic implementation.  Instructional Administrators, Principals, and Teacher Leaders have worked closely with District Leaders and Curriculum Cabinets to facilitate curriculum-alignment efforts to ensure that all teachers are informed of standards and are prepared to demonstrate improved pedagogical and instructional skills in their respective areas of expertise.  A primary and essential focus has been placed on reading and writing proficiency and skill development in all areas.  Spearheaded by our Curriculum Cabinet for Language Arts and Instructional Leaders, we will implement a series of professional learning opportunities for K-5 teachers who have been implementing the Calkins Units of Study for Writing and Reading. Grades 6-12 teachers are deeply engaged in course alignment to learning standards for Literacy

    CTLE Providers

    • District Instructional Leaders and Administrators
    • Capital Region BOCES
      • Literacy Specialists
    • Elementary Language Arts Coordinators and Literacy Coaches
    • Lesley University- District-level Literacy Coaches will train school-based literacy coaches. These will be on-site, face-to-face sessions.  Participating coaches will earn 6 graduate credits from Lesley University.  The rigors of the training prepare the coaches to work effectively with children as well as adults in the school.
    • Capital District Writing Project
    • Others TBD

    Action Plan

    Inputs

    Revision of curriculum documents for integration of NG literacy frameworks into content area documents

    Evidence

    Revised curriculum documentation for communication of shifts

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction,  Curriculum Cabinets, Building Principals, Instructional Administrators

    Timeline

    Ongoing

    Inputs

    Facilitate Literacy Lessons Training Class for K-5 ENL and Special ED Teachers

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, etc.)

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendents for Instruction,  Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, University Partners (Lesley)

    Timeline

    2019-20 School Year

    Inputs

    Monthly Literacy Staff Development Collaborations for K-5 teachers

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, etc.)

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendents for Instruction,  Building Principals, Language Arts Cabinet and Coordinators

    Timeline

    Monthly

    Inputs

    Build administrative and leadership capacity to support planning and implementation of an instructional coaching model in Guilderland

    Evidence

    Training Materials, district collaborations, meeting minutes,

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, PD Committee(s), administrators

    Timeline

    Summer 2019-20

    Inputs

    Initiate training of school-based Literacy Coaches Coaches by district trainers (Nell Ball and Katie Barker) and Lesley University.

    Evidence

    Training Materials, district collaborations, meeting minutes,

    Implementation plans

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Literacy Coaches, Principals

    Timeline

    2019-20 School Year

    NSDC Standards Alignment

    Context

    • Learning Communities
    • Resources

    Process

    • Research-Based
    • Design
    • Learning
    • Collaboration

    Content

    • Quality Teaching

    GCSD Professional Growth and Evaluation Domain

    • Instruction
    • Learning Environment
    • Assessment

    Objective 4.2: Provide opportunities for staff to enhance their content knowledge and learn appropriate teaching strategies based upon Next Generation Learning Standards and best practices in respective disciplines. 

     Essential Question: How can professional development strengthen content knowledge and pedagogy of all content area teachers?

    Activities & Strategies

    • Content Area Development – Learning research-based instructional techniques to improve student achievement in content areas
      • Reading, Writing, and Language Arts approaches – Readers and Writers Workshop, Guided Reading and Writing, Fountas and Pinnell, Book Clubs, etc.
      • Math, Science and Social Studies
      • Special Education including Speech and Language, OT, PT
      • World Languages and Cultures
      • Counseling, Social Work, Guidance
      • Fine Arts including Music, Art, Drama
      • Physical Education and Health
      • Library, Media, and Instructional Technology
      • Business Education, Technology Education, and Family and Consumer Science
    • Through orientation and mentoring, provide knowledge of Guilderland programs and their relationship to NYS and Next Generation(NG) learning standards
    • Provide mentoring to new teachers in using appropriate teaching strategies; help new teachers to become familiar with expected instructional practices

    Continuing Teacher and Leader Effectiveness (CTLE)

    Teachers and leaders will continue analysis of NYS learning standards for immediate implementation.  Instructional Administrators, Principals, and Teacher Leaders have worked closely with District Leaders and Curriculum Cabinets to provide a rigorous curriculum mapping effort to ensure that all teachers are informed of standards and are prepared to demonstrate improved pedagogical and instructional skills in their respective areas of expertise.  Additionally, teachers and leaders have been provided focused professional development around such learning standards by Capital Region BOCES

    CTLE Providers

    • District Instructional Leaders and Administrators
    • Capital Region BOCES
    • Paul Anderson (via Questar 3 BOCES)- Paul Andersen is an educational consultant and YouTube creator living in Bozeman, MT.  Paul is an experienced educator having taught science in Montana for 20 years.  Paul was the 2011 Montana Teacher of the Year, and was also one of four finalists for the 2011 National Teacher of the Year.  In addition to teaching Paul has created hundreds of YouTube science tutorials that have been viewed millions of times by students around the world.  In 2012 Paul was selected by YouTube as one of ten YouTube Edu Gurus.Paul has provided training for thousands of students, teachers, administrators, and professors around the world.  Paul’s specialties include the Next Generation Science Standards, educational technology, the flipped classroom, and effective classroom design.  Paul enjoys providing meaningful professional development that can be applied immediately in the classroom.  In addition to his work as a trainer Paul is an experienced keynote speaker.  Paul graduated from Montana State University with a degree in Biology with Broadfield Science Certification.  He holds a Masters of Science in Science Education.  In addition to working Paul loves spending time with his family skiing and hiking in the mountains around Bozeman.
    • Others TBD

    Action Plan

    Inputs

    Provide responsive and targeted professional development opportunities in all content areas and specialties

    Evidence

    PD evaluation surveys to measure participation rates and collegial sharing related to content, student achievement and learning standards.

    My Learning Plan Surveys, reports and Evaluations

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, feedback forms, etc.)

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Building Principals, Instructional Administrators, GEMS, Teacher Leaders

    Timeline

    Summer 2019 (mandated orientation for all new teachers

    Ongoing support and mentoring

    Department and school-based collaborations

    Inputs

    Provide focused PD to elementary teachers implementing Investigations math program

    Evidence

    Feedback tools, surveys, meeting minutes,

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Math Specialists, Program trainers

    Timeline

    Spring 2019, 2019-20 school year

    Inputs

    Provide focused PD to elementary teachers implementing Smithsonian science modules

    Evidence

    Feedback tools, surveys, meeting minutes,

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Science Teacher Leaders, BOCES Science specialists and trainers

    Timeline

    Spring 2019, 2019-20 school year

    Inputs

    Assess alignment of PD offerings with identified needs (departments and school)

    Evidence

    MyLearningPlan Purpose reports

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Building Principals, Instructional Administrators, Data Coordinator

    Timeline

    Ongoing

    NSDC Standards Alignment

    Context

    • Learning Communities
    • Resources

    Process

    • Research Based
    • Design
    • Learning
    • Collaboration

    Content

    • Equity
    • Quality Teaching

    GCSD Professional Growth and Evaluation Domain

    • Instruction
    • Assessment
    • Learning Environment
    • Professionalism

    Goal #5: Maintain a community focused on the prevention of harassment and discriminatory behaviors through the promotion of education measures meant to positively impact school culture and climate.

    Objective 5.1: Dignity for All Students Act Continue to provide professional development to help staff understand and follow all revisions to the District’s Code of Conduct and Board policies regarding the Dignity for All Students Act.

    Essential Question: How can a safe and respectful school community foster learning and student achievement?

    Activities & Strategies

    • Plan and implement PD programs designed to prepare staff to fully implement practices and expectations articulated in the Code-of-Conduct and Board policies
    • Provide ongoing professional learning on culturally-responsive school and district practices
    • Provide Focused training to support educators in their efforts to provide safe and secure learning environments for LGBTQA students

    Continuing Teacher and Leader Effectiveness (CTLE)

    Teachers and leaders will continue to participate in annual trainings to ensure that all staff members are well informed about the regulations, needs, and plans for compliance with the Dignity for All Students Act.  Additionally, professional development programs will be implemented to develop collective sensitivity and awareness of cultural and socioeconomic differences in our community. 

    CTLE Providers

    • District Instructional Leaders and Administrators
    • Capital Region BOCES
    • Amanda Nickerson from the Alberti Center at the University of Buffalo may be scheduled to provide professional development to employees in these critical areas. Furthermore, professional development activities will be provided to expand our collective understanding of humanistic behavior management strategies employed by staff.  School and District DASA Coordinators will also participate in DASA trainings.
    • Lyndon Cudlitz- Consultant and former Director of Education and Training for the Pride Center of the Capital Region. For 16 years, Lyndon Cudlitz has been providing training and technical assistance to schools, healthcare providers, and businesses seeking to enhance environments and services for LGBTQ individuals. Lyndon has worked for several LGBTQ youth organizations in the Northeast and has founded & directed social justice leadership camps nationally.
    • Stacy Williams is an Assistant Professor at Marist College.   She is also a Licensed Psychologist and Certified School Psychologist in New York State.  At the national level, Dr. Williams serves on the Trainers of School Psychologists (TSP) executive board, where she co-chairs the Social Justice task force and serves as membership coordinator.  In addition, Dr. Williams mentors students and early-career faculty of color through the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) mentoring program. At the state level, Dr. Williams has mentored school psychology candidates, and created and managed content for the state association annual conference.  Dr. Williams and her students organized a Social Justice Student strand. A practitioner-scholar, Dr. Williams’ years of working with groups of K-12 at-risk learners in both urban and rural communities have given her clear insights into the frustrations, challenges, and joys of working as a school psychologist.  She has consulted with Instructional Support Teams (IST) in New York, Connecticut, and rural communities in Jamaica, working closely with educational practitioners integrating Response to Intervention (RTI) initiatives at the IST level. Dr. Williams provides training in social justice, inclusive classrooms, academic and behavioral interventions, databased decision-making, and university/school partnerships.

    Action Plan

    Inputs

    Plan and implement opportunities for presentation of SAVE plan, including refresher On DASA and codes-of-conduct developed for district and all levels

    Evidence

    Inclusion of instructional practices in common curriculum and school-wide presentations

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, feedback forms, etc.)

    Responsibility

    Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Building and Assistant/House Principals, Professional Development Committee, Curriculum Cabinets

    Timeline

    Summer-Fall 2019

    Inputs

    Prepare and distribute to all stakeholders developmentally appropriate versions of codes-of conduct

    Evidence

    Inclusion of revised codes-of-conduct in all parent and student handbooks

    Posting of all codes and policies on district web site

    Promotion of behavioral expectations in all schools and classrooms

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Building and assistant/House Principals,

    Timeline

    Summer-Fall 2019

    Inputs

    Plan and Implement training for all Building Level DASA coordinators

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, etc.)

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, DASA Coordinators

    Timeline

    Summer 2019

    Inputs

    Plan and implement professional learning for school and district leaders focused on culturally responsive practices

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, etc.)

    Summer Leadership Retreat

    Responsibility

    Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Retreat Planning Committee

    Timeline

    Summer 2019

    Inputs

    Plan and implement professional development for all staff on best practices to support our LGBQTA population

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, etc.)

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Building Principals, Alliance clubs and representatives, Capital Region Pride Center

    Timeline

    2019-20 School Year

    Inputs

    Initiate planning for all instructional staff on Positive behavior management strategies

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, etc.)

    Responsibility

    PPS Director, Special ed. administrators, Building Principals, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction

    Timeline

    2019-20 school year

    NSDC Standards Alignment

    Context

    • Learning Communities
    • Leadership
    • Resources

    Process

    • Research Based
    • Design
    • Learning
    • Collaboration

    Content

    • Equity

    GCSD Professional Growth and Evaluation Domain

    • Learning Environment
    • Communication

    Objective 5.2: Provide professional development to help staff work effectively with at-risk student populations

    Essential Question: How can faculty and staff effectively, safely and constructively support students exhibiting at risk behaviors or circumstances?

    Activities & Strategies

    • Plan and implement PD programs designed to inform faculty and staff of types and severity of student mental health issues, including crisis intervention and behavior management
    • Build capacity and skill amongst administrators to recognize and support faculty, staff and students experiencing socio-economic challenges
    • Consult with experts in the field to develop capacity for successful interventions with students struggling with mental health issues

    Continuing Teacher and Leader Effectiveness (CTLE)

    Teachers, support staff, and leaders will participate in trainings to ensure that all staff members are well informed about the regulations, needs, and plans for compliance with the Dignity for All Students Act.  Additionally, professional development programs will be implemented to develop collective sensitivity and awareness of cultural and socioeconomic differences in our community.  Educators are in unique a position to notice emotional and behavioral changes in their students. These changes, whether related to a mental health crisis or not, can impact a student’s ability to learn, academic performance, and overall motivation. Conversely, in cases where there is a mental health issue present, not only is the student negatively impacted, but so are their classmates as well as the educator. Such negative impact may include conflict with classmates and classroom disruptions. Additionally, an educator’s inability to properly manage a classroom, due to such situations, can impact their perceived teaching effectiveness and performance evaluations (classroom observations, student test outcomes, etc. Professional learning opportunities will be provided to further strengthen our collective awareness and understanding of social emotional needs of students.

     

    CTLE Providers

    • District Instructional Leaders and Administrators
    • Capital Region BOCES
    • Amanda Nickerson- (http://gse.buffalo.edu/about/directory/staff/nickerson
    • Tabetha Zostant, BS– Tabetha started her career as a child care worker in a youth shelter. She joined Parsons Child &Family Center in 2008 and worked with SATRI in a number of roles within both member agencies, Northeast Parent & Child Society and Parsons, to provide services to children and Families. In 2014, Tabetha took a job with New York State Professional Development Program delivering training on the CONNECTIONS Case Management System, casework practice, and other related subjects relevant to child welfare personnel in local Departments of Social Services and voluntary agencies.  In 2016 Tabetha rejoined the SATRI team as the training manager.  She is a certified trainer in the following curriculum:  Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST), Safe talk, Attachment, Self-Regulation and Competency (ARC), Handle with Care Therapeutic response, Therapeutic crisis intervention, NCTSN’s Caring for Children who have Experienced Trauma, and Real Life HEROES.
    • School Counselors, social workers, and psychologists
    • Others TBD

    Action Plan

    Inputs

    Plan and implement opportunities for professional development on student mental health issues and needs

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, feedback forms, etc.)

    Responsibility

    Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Building and Assistant/House Principals, GCSD Related professionals (Psychologists, Social Workers, Counselors), PPS Director

    Timeline

    Summer 2019-Spring 2020

    Inputs

    Prepare and distribute to all stakeholders supporting resources and documents

    Evidence

    Promotion of behavioral expectations in all schools and classrooms

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Building and assistant/House Principals, Communications Specialist, Related Professionals, PPS Director

    Timeline

    2019-20 School Year

    Inputs

    Provide administrator training to ensure constructive and supportive intervention when dealing with struggling students and/or personnel

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, feedback forms, etc.)

    Responsibility

    District Office Team

    Timeline

    Summer 2018

    NSDC Standards Alignment

    Context

    • Leadership
    • Resources

    Process

    • Research-Based
    • Design

    Content

    • Equity
    • Family Involvement

    GCSD Professional Growth and Evaluation Domain

    • Learning Environment
    • Communication

    Goal #6:  Provide meaningful and ongoing professional development for effective implementations of best practices for support of all learners and sub groups

    Objective 6.1: Implement adopted amendments to Part 154 of the Commissioner’s Regulations regarding English as a New Language (ENL) and students with disabilities. Provide professional development to help staff understand and follow all revisions to the Part 154 Regulations and IDEA legal requirements.

    Essential Question: How can GCSD assure that students with limited English and/or disabilities are provided opportunities to achieve the same educational goals and standards established for all students.

    Activities & Strategies

    • Plan and implement PD programs designed to prepare staff to fully implement practices and expectations regarding ELLs and SWDs
    • Build capacity and skill amongst staff via study groups, building teams, and district-wide committee for effective instruction and support of ENL students and families
    • Provide all teachers and administrators professional development to meet the needs of disabled and ENL students.
    • Utilize all available student information to inform planning of responsive instructional practices

    Continuing Teacher and Leader Effectiveness (CTLE)

    Continuing Teacher and Leader Effectiveness (CTLE)

    Teachers and leaders will continue to participate in annual trainings to ensure that all staff members are well informed about Part 154 regulations, student needs, and district plans to support all English Language Learners. Such efforts will be coordinated and facilitated by our Instructional Administrator for World Languages and Cultures/ENL Professional development programs will be implemented to develop collective understanding of language and cultural differences as well as best instructional practices to support such students.  Additionally, ENL teachers will collaborate and learn with classroom teachers participating in all professional development activities described previously.  Dr. Amanda Nickerson from the Alberti Center at the University of Buffalo may also address needs of ELLs in her presentations and workshops. 

    CTLE Providers

    • District Instructional Leaders and Administrators
    • Assistant Superintendent for Instruction
    • Pupil Personnel Services Director and Special Education Administrators
    • Capital Region BOCES
    • Instructional Administrator for ENL
    • Amanda Nickerson- (http://gse.buffalo.edu/about/directory/staff/nickerson
    • Karen Gregory is the inaugural MAT-TESOL Director and Assistant Professor at Clarkson University, Capital Region Campus. Prior to this, Dr. Gregory worked from 2016-2018 as an ELL Specialist in the Albany City School District, where she taught English as a New Language to newcomer refugee and immigrant high school students at the Albany International Center and co-taught science and social studies. She also worked for many years as a high school Spanish teacher, and more recently as a research associate in the School of Education at the University at Albany, SUNY. Dr. Gregory’s research is focused on best practices of teaching English as a second/new language, TESOL professional development, and social-ecological approaches to whole school improvement. Dr. Gregory has published in the TESOL Encyclopedia of English Language Learning, as well as journals including NYS TESOL Journal, The Journal of School Leadership, and the Journal for Leadership and Instruction, and has contributed to several book chapters on TESOL pedagogy and school improvement.
    • Gretchen Oliver – educational consultant, classroom educator, SUNY Albany and Clarkson professor and researcher. Dr. Oliver’s experience includes serving as Project Coordinator of a U.S. Department of Education funded research and professional development initiative that focused on working with teams of high school STEM and English as a New Language instructors to develop strategies to help ELL students master academic vocabulary in STEM and other subject areas. 
    • Martina Bex (https://martinabex.com/) – Founder of The Comprehensible Classroom. Former Syracuse University instructor with a Masters in Spanish Language, Literature, and Culture. Teaching everything from Spanish 101 to 400-level conversation courses, her classes were filled with (mostly) highly motivated students who spent many hours on their Spanish homework and studying for exams each week. In October 2008, she moved from New York to Alaska. She began teaching full time in August 2009 at Clark Middle School in the Anchorage School District using primarily Cooperative Learning methods. In April 2010, observed one of Michele Whaley’s Russian classes at West High School as part of ASD’s new teacher mentorship program. After a weekend holed up with NTPRS DVDs trying to make sense of what she had just witnessed, she began using TPRS/CI exclusively when she returned to class.

    Action Plan

    Inputs

    Plan and implement additional opportunities for presentation of Part 154 regulations for district and all levels

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, feedback forms, etc.)

    Responsibility

    Instructional Administrator for WLC/ESL, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Building Principals, PPS director, SPED administrators, SPED Teacher Leaders

    Timeline

    Summer-Fall 2019

    Inputs

    Prepare pertinent documents and resources to inform stakeholders of Part 154, IDEA, etc.

    Evidence

    Inclusion of documents in handbooks and web-based resources

    Promotion new requirements in all schools and classrooms

    Responsibility

    Instructional Administrator for WLC/ESL, Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Building Principals,

    Timeline

    Summer-Fall 2019

    Inputs

    Facilitate focused training for educators to better understand language acquisition and challenges faced by ELLs

    Evidence

    Training program and related documentation

    Responsibility

    Instructional Administrator for WLC/ESL, Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Building Principals

    Timeline

    Fall 2019

    NSDC Standards Alignment

    Context

    • Learning Communities
    • Leadership
    • Resources

    Process

    • Data-Driven
    • Research-Based
    • Design
    • Learning
    • Collaboration
    • Evaluation

    Content

    • Equity
    • Quality Teaching
    • Family Involvement

    GCSD Professional Growth and Evaluation Domain

    • Instruction
    • Learning Environment
    • Communication

    Objective 6.2: Continue to Provide professional development opportunities to help teachers and administrators develop their understanding of inclusive instructional practices.

    Essential Question: How can faculty, administration and staff effectively include and support all students in a sound and basic educational model regardless of disability or challenge?

    Activities & Strategies

    • Plan and implement PD programs designed to inform faculty and administrators of models in which students with and without disabilities are based are based in a regular structure
    • Build capacity and skill amongst administrators and teachers to recognize and support inclusive practices whereby student-centered and strength-based models are employed
    • Consult with experts in the field to develop capacity for successful interventions with students struggling to achieve success through strategic and individualized assessment and grading practices
    • Provide professional development to ensure that all students regardless of individual needs experience classroom climates that embrace diversity, foster sense of social responsibility, and support positive peer relationships.

    Continuing Teacher and Leader Effectiveness (CTLE)

    Teachers and leaders will continue to participate in learning opportunities designed to ensure that they are well informed about IDEA, Part 154 regulations, NYS Blueprint for Special Education, and district plans to support all English Language Learners and Students with Disabilities. Professional development programs will be implemented to develop collective understanding of the rights of all learners as well as the best instructional practices intended to support their needs. Identified needs (equity, grading, and pacing) will be a focus of planned collaborations and sessions with experts in those areas (Karen Bailey).

    An ongoing effort has been made to promote equity via inclusive school practices and to maximize access to curriculum by all learners.

    CTLE Providers

    • District Instructional Leaders and Administrators
    • Assistant Superintendent for Instruction
    • Pupil Personnel Services Director
    • Instructional Administrator for WLC/ENL
    • Karen Gregory
    • Gretchen Oliver
    • Stacy Williams
    • Lisa Knowles, Mehgan Rivers, Kellee Deolde

    Action Plan

    Inputs

    Plan and implement opportunities for professional development on best instructional practices to support a diverse student population

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, feedback forms, etc.)

    Program descriptors, course development, curriculum maps, personnel shifts

    Responsibility

    Director of Pupil Personnel Services, Special Education Administrators, Instructional Administrator for WLC/ENL, Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Building and Assistant/House Principals

    Timeline

    2019-20 School Year

    Inputs

    Prepare and distribute supporting resources and documents

    Evidence

    Promotion of school and classroom norms and expectations via written documents and materials, handbooks, web page, etc.

    Responsibility

    Director of Pupil Personnel Services, Special Education Administrators, Instructional Administrator for WLC/ESL, Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction

    Timeline

    2019-20 School Year

    Inputs

    Establish professional relationships with clinical experts and organizations

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, feedback forms, etc.)

    Responsibility

    PPS Director, Special Education Administrators, Building and Assistant/House Principals, GCSD Related professionals (Psychologists, Social Workers, Counselors), PPS Director

    Timeline

    2019-20 school year

    Inputs

    Facilitate focused professional learning for teachers of Co-taught classes

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, feedback forms, etc.)

    Responsibility

    Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Building and Assistant/House Principals, Instructional administrators, PPS Director, Special Education Administrators

    Timeline

    2019-20 school year

    NSDC Standards Alignment

    Context

    • Learning Communities
    • Leadership
    • Resources

    Process

    • Research Based
    • Data-Driven
    • Design
    • Learning

    Content

    • Equity
    • Quality Teaching
    • Family Involvement

    GCSD Professional Growth and Evaluation Domain

    • Learning Environment
    • Instruction
    • Communication

    Objective 6.2: Provide collaboration opportunities designed to strengthen co-teaching practices at all levels.

    Essential Question: How can faculty, administration and staff effectively implement best practices in co-taught learning environments?

    Activities & Strategies

    • Implement PD programs designed to inform faculty and administrators of best practices when working with diverse learner populations
    • Build capacity and skill amongst administrators and teachers to interpret and support academic goals and IEPs for students with disabilities
    • Consult with experts in the field to develop capacity for successful co-planning and differentiation of instruction
    • Maximize the use of eDoctrina and  IEP direct for record keeping, documentation and reporting

    Plan and facilitate ongoing collaborations and programs focused on Differentiated Instruction

    Continuing Teacher and Leader Effectiveness (CTLE)

    Coupled with the district’s efforts to employ inclusive and equitable school practices and maximize access for all learners to curriculum, a significant expansion of co-taught classes has occurred.  This work has warranted sustained professional development efforts on the guidelines for Universal Design for Learning.  The district has collaborated with sever professional developers to support this critical work.  They include, the Center for Applied Special Technologies (CAST)s, Dr. Julie Causton and Dr. Richard Villa. 

    CTLE Providers

    • District Instructional Leaders and Administrators
    • Assistant Superintendent for Instruction
    • Pupil Personnel Services Director
    • Capital Region BOCES
    • Karen Gregory
    • Dr. Gretchen Oliver

    Action Plan

    Inputs

    Plan and implement opportunities for professional development on co-teaching and planning

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, feedback forms, etc.)

    Responsibility

    Director of Pupil Personnel Services, Special Education Administrators, Principals, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, GCSD Related professionals (Psychologists, Social Workers, Counselors),

    Timeline

    Summer 2018-Spring 2019

    Inputs

    Plan and implement opportunities for further professional development on principles of Universal Design

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, feedback forms, etc.)

    Responsibility

    Director of Pupil Personnel Services, Special Education Administrators, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction,

    Timeline

    2019-20 School Year

    Inputs

    Plan and implement opportunities for professional development on Differentiation of Instruction

    Evidence

    Communication Artifacts (meeting agendas, minutes, materials, guidance documents, feedback forms, etc.)

    Responsibility

    Director of Pupil Personnel Services, Special Education Administrators, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction,

    Timeline

    2019-20 school year

    NSDC Standards Alignment

    Context

    • Leadership
    • Resources

    Process

    • Research Based
    • Data-Driven
    • Design
    • Learning

    Content

    • Equity
    • Quality Teaching
    • Family Involvement

    VI. Mentor Plan (G.E.M.S)

    Mission Statement The purpose of mentoring is to provide support and reflective guidance to new teachers using a team approach.  An effective mentor program needs trust, confidentiality, non-judgmental interactions, and mutual respect.  The results of mentoring are more effective teaching, a collegial atmosphere that encourages professional growth, celebration of success and providing a comfortable transition of new teachers into the culture of the Guilderland District.

     Belief Statement The Guilderland Teachers Association, in an effort to provide support and reflective guidance to its new teachers, has developed a mentoring program.  The mentoring program employs a team approach which affords new teachers the benefit of interacting with many colleagues of varied experiences, grade levels and subject areas.

    Goals The Mentors and Mentees at each school are encouraged to meet as a group at least once a month. The goals of the Guilderland Educators Mentoring for Success are as follows:

    • Easing the transition of new teachers
    • Creating a collegial atmosphere that encourages professional growth
    • Celebrating successes
    • Developing more effective teaching
    • Establishing a trusting relationship to assimilate new teachers into the cultural context of the Guilderland School District

    An effective mentor program needs trusting relationships in order to address questions, needs, and concerns of new teachers. Through confidential, nonjudgmental interaction, veteran professionals meet regularly with new teachers to support their growth and development.  This teacher generated mentor program is conducted with the support of the administrative network.

    Program Roles and Responsibilities 

    DISTRICT-WIDE COORDINATOR:

    • Veteran mentor teacher with a minimum of three years mentoring experience
    • An active member of the GTA
    • Recommended by a building president or member of the GTA Executive Board
    • Recommended by another mentor
    • Appointed by the Representative Council

    Expectations:

    • Advocate for the mentor program at all levels
    • Attend mentor meetings periodically in various buildings
    • Coordinate training for mentors
    • Provide a professional role model
    • Facilitate ongoing reflection and discussion to revise or further develop the mentor program
    • Provide opportunities for the mentees to reflect on their mentee experience and to share with other mentees
    • Act as liaison among the mentor program and the district administrators, building administrators, and/or Instructional Administrators
    • Submit a yearly budget for the Mentor Program to Guilderland Teachers’ Association (GTA) Representative Council for approval

    MENTOR:

    • Tenured teacher
    • Two Recommendations obtained from colleagues
    • One recommendation from an administrator or supervisor

    Characteristics of a Mentor:

    • Effective communication and interpersonal skills
    • Leadership qualities
    • Organizational skills
    • Positive attitude toward professional growth
    • Enthusiasm
    • Ability to see many different ways to accomplish a purpose or goal

    Expectations:

    • Confidentiality: Establish a trusting relationship
    • Availability to:  Provide support in a non-judgmental way; Attend meetings on a regular basis; Be accessible and approachable; Participate in training
    • Guidance: Acquaint each mentee with the district and specific school’s culture; Model professional expectations and practice; Provide curriculum support; Foster collegial relationships and social dynamics
    • Help with strategies to meet challenges
    • Model Professionalism
    • Encourage classroom visitations of colleagues’ classrooms as stated in contract
    • Celebrate successes

        BUILDING MENTOR LIAISON ROLE:

        • Schedule a meeting with the building principal by October 1st to:
          • Clarify membership of the program
          • Share meeting schedule
          • Share tentative agenda topics
        • Schedule a meeting with the building principal and one building mentor by June 1st to discuss overall program evaluation
        • Act as liaison to principal, mentors, mentees, and Advisory Team; meetings scheduled at the discretion of the Mentor Liaison
        • Explain, distribute and compile monthly and bi-annual program evaluations
        • Serve on Advisory Team

        ADMINISTRATORS:

        • District Assistant Superintendent for Instruction
        • Building Administrator/s
        • Supervisor/s

        Expectations:

        • Value and trust the mentor program
        • Encourage
        • Veteran staff to participate as mentors
        • Mentees to participate in mentor program
        • Help mentees maintain balance among their classroom responsibilities and extracurricular activities and other professional expectations
        • Support professional development activities and support classroom visitations
        • Write recommendations for potential mentors
        • Meet at beginning and end of year with Mentor Liaison (or District-wide Coordinator, as appropriate)
        • Mentoring and evaluation are mutually exclusive (mentors do not evaluate)
        • Respect confidentiality of mentoring program and discussions among mentors and mentees

        MENTOR ADVISORY TEAM:

        The team will consist of:

        • 1 Elementary Mentor Liaison per building
        • 2 Middle School Mentor Liaisons
        • 2 High School Mentor Liaisons
        • Assistant Superintendent for Instruction
        • District-wide Mentor Coordinator
        • 1 Supervisor

        The Mentor Advisory Team with meet at the following times:

        • February and May -To review program assessment forms
        • June – Discuss training and forthcoming year planning

        Other Mentor Advisory Team meetings will be added each school year as needed.

         MENTEE:

        Level I mentee (new to teaching)

        • First year, newly hired probationary teacher
        • Part-time, new to district
        • Full-time temporary teachers for teachers on Leave of Absence (LOA)

        Level II mentee (previous experience, full or part-time)

        • New to district, previously tenured
        • New to district, experienced but not tenured

          Level III mentee (experienced GCSD teacher)

        • New to grade level/subject area
        • Second and third year probationary teacher
        • New to building
        • Returning from extended LOA

        Expectations:

        • Regularly attend mentor meetings
        • Openly share successes and concerns
        • Arrive on time, prepared, and ready to participate
        • To listen with respect and with intent to understand
        • To be open and honest
        • Celebrate the positive
        • Nurture and develop leadership in self and others
        • Honor confidentiality
        • Understand the need to balance classroom responsibility and school wide activities
        • A visitation is strongly recommended the first year
        • Have at least 2 visitations the second year
        • Have at least 3 visitations the third year

        Appendix of Forms can be obtained by contacting building leadership.

          Approved by the Board of Education – May 23, 2000

          Updated and Approved – June 25, 2002

          Updated and Approved – June 24, 2003

          Updated and Approved – June 22, 2004

           Updated and Approved – June 21, 2005

          Updated and Approved – June 20, 2006

          Updated and Approved – June 19, 2007

          Updated and Approved – June 24, 2008

          Updated and Approved – June 23, 2009

          Updated and Approved – August 17, 2010

          Updated and Approved – August 16, 2011

          Updated and Approved – June 21, 2012

          Updated and Approved – July 2, 2013

          Updated and Approved – July 1, 2014

          Updated and Approved – August 18, 2015

          Updated and Approved –    August 16, 2016

          Updated and Approved – September 12, 2017

          Updated and Approved – July 5, 2018

          Updated and Approved – July 2, 2019

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